Apr 172017
 

Today I’m happy to feature my talented friend and neighbor, Florida author Nancy Blanton. Her award-winning historical novels are set primarily in 17th century Ireland and her latest, The Prince of Glencurragh, (published in July 2016) has already won three awards and is a finalist for two others. I put on my interviewer hat to share about Nancy Blanton and her latest release.

I put on my interviewer hat to tell you about @NancyBlanton and the Prince. Click To Tweet

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Picture of Nancy Blanton with my husband.

Author Nancy Blanton and  a different prince.

Nancy, what made you decide to focus on historical fiction?

It is what I love to read. I like to learn as I read, and I feel my time is well-spent. Recently I posted about my favorite book, the first historical novel I read: Gone with the Wind. I learned so much about America’s Civil War and its aftermath. I was fascinated and hooked. Many writers avoid historical fiction because it requires so much research, but for me, that’s the best part. It’s a treasure hunt to discover the details that will bring history to life.

Why did you choose 17th century Ireland?

My father emphasized our Irish heritage when I was growing up. We heard the music, sang the songs, wore the green, marched in the parade—all that. Our family toured Ireland when I was 15, and he sent me to Ireland for a summer study during my junior year in college. That I would want to write about it seems only natural. But when I started researching, I realized books about the 16th and 18th centuries were prominent, but not so much the 17th. A study for the Historical Novel Society found that the 17th century ranks 7th among time periods readers are most likely to choose when buying a book. This surprised me because it’s an exciting time of sweeping change: the Irish clan system is overtaken by the English plantation system and Cromwell led his bloody march. I saw a niche for myself and made it my mission to illuminate this period.

Most novels set out to explore a question. What question did you have in mind when writing The Prince of Glencurragh?

In 17th century Ireland, many hopes and dreams were destroyed, so I was asking, “Is it possible to reclaim a dream once it is lost to the mists of memory?” In this book, a young Irishman faces seemingly insurmountable obstacles to achieve his father’s dream of a castle and estate called Glencurragh.

Dreams are sometimes fulfilled in ways we do not expect. Click To Tweet

The premise is interesting on two levels. First, everyone has awakened from a dream so beautiful they want to hold onto it, but the longer they are awake the faster it recedes. And second, many of us have seen the sacrifices our parents made and then tried to live their dream for them, only to realize later that it doesn’t satisfy. And dreams are sometimes fulfilled in ways we had not expected.

What themes does the book address?

In many ways, this book is about friendship, the relationship between best friends from childhood. The story is narrated by Faolan’s best friend Aengus O’Daly. I have some very deep and lasting friendships of this kind, and those relationships informed this story in ways I didn’t realize until the end. I am deeply grateful to my friends for that.

This story is also about hope. In great difficulty, when you have no power to change a painful circumstance, hope — the most human part of us — is what we rely on to get through.

What will readers find most appealing about this book?

This book captivates readers right away because it is fast-paced and rich with interesting historical detail. The 17th century is rife with conflict, disaster, invention and change.

The story also is relevant because it focuses on issues we still face today, such as the oppression of ethnic groups and women, the struggle for survival and the struggle to achieve one’s dream. It is also a very personal struggle that most of us can relate to. Faolán is tested, just as anyone is who aspires to a goal. You want this thing, and it seems the mountain grows suddenly higher, the road more rugged, forcing you to show just how much you’re willing to fight for what you want.

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The Prince of Glencurragh by Nancy Blanton, is available in e-book, softcover, and hardcover on amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com and from other online booksellers.

 

Apr 062017
 

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” – Henry David Thoreau

There is no remedy for love but to love more. Click To Tweet

“People are weird. When we find someone with weirdness that is compatible with ours, we team up and call it love.” – Dr. Seuss

When we find someone with weirdness that is compatible with ours, we team up and call it love. Click To Tweet

“Love me when I least deserve it because that’s when I really need it.” – Swedish proverb

Love me when I least deserve it because that’s when I really need it. Click To Tweet

“If you love a flower, don’t pick it up. Because if you pick it up, it dies and it ceases to be what you love. So if you love a flower, let it be. Love is not about possession. It is about appreciation.” – Osho

Love is not about possession. It is about appreciation. Click To Tweet

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Andrea Patten has managed to love her inner editor long enough to publish  The Inner Critic Advantage: Making Peace With the Noise in Your Head a little book full of big ideas about how — and why — you can learn to love “that voice.”   The Inner Critic Advantage is now available on Amazon.

 April 6, 2017  Posted by  E, Happiness, Self care No Responses »
Mar 272017
 

One of the very best things about attending book events is the opportunity to connect with other authors. I’ve been looking for a way to share them with you and have decided to try a Visiting Author series. (Please be sure to give me your feedback about this idea in the comments.)

I recently “met” someone who is successfully doing something I’ve considered from time to time: RV-living. She has maintained a roving lifestyle — with husband and dog — for over five years. She wrote in her blog:

“Living in close quarters can be difficult. But I think I’ve found a solution. One day I had a thought. Was I looking at this all wrong? Was there a solution to our size-challenged abode? Could it be as simple as changing my attitude in my place of residence?

I believe a change in attitude IS the answer – wherever you live. In an RV, an apartment or ginormous mansion. For me, I asked the Lord for an ample supply of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness and an extra measure of self-control. Adding these attributes made our journey much more joyful.”

I believe a change in attitude IS the answer - wherever you live. Click To Tweet

Janetta Fudge Messmer is an author of two Christian comedies (Early Birds and Southbound Birds). She also has a historical romance, Chords of Love, which is the book she shares with you today. She’ll take it from here.

Abigail Jane Thompson is sassy and certain she’s not singing. Anywhere. Imagine her delight when she spies the Central City Opera House in total ruin. Noah Presley, owner of Presley Mercantile, has a plan to restore the once-celebrated building. Fate throws Abigail and Noah together. Will they see beyond their differences, or will their love end on a sour note?

Everyone in the writing world tells writers we MUST make our characters memorable. From the first page of Chords of Love, Abigail tends toward sassiness. No one, including Abby, knows what will come out of her mouth:

“Daughter, is there something you want to tell me?” Papa slowed his horse to a stop next to her.

Abigail had to tell him the latest or she’d burst at the seams. Without a moment’s hesitation she said, “Papa, we’ve only lived here a little more than a month, but what I heard Mama say to the owner of Presley Mercantile yesterday is sure to twist the ends of your moustache.”

Papa turned in his saddle. “What did she say this time?”

Abigail cleared her throat and sat higher in her side-saddle. “Now, remember, Papa, I’m quoting Mama. She said, ‘Mr. Noah Presley, I despise this dirty, desolate town of yours.’”

Her father’s eyes twinkled as he glanced sideways at her. Abby knew she’d gotten away with a little sassiness on their riding excursion, but when they returned to Central City, one of his stern looks would shush her right up.

“Oh, how I love that woman.” Papa chuckled, then his expression grew more stern. “But tell me she really didn’t say those things.” He stroked Dancer’s neck. His horse stayed steady on the rocky path leading out of the little mining town.

“Yes, and there’s more, Papa. You’d better hold tight to the reins for this one.” Abigail did the same, as if she needed to get ready, too. “Mama also told Mr. Presley, ‘You people can’t even keep your opera house running. It’s simply disgraceful.’”

As you can see, Abigail’s a tad feisty. What would you say your personality type is? Funny? Bossy? Introvert? Extrovert? For those of you who have never taken a personality test – I highly recommend it. It’s lots of fun.

Now it’s time to learn a bit about me. My dream from an early age was to write. With pen in hand, and now a computer on my lap, words come forth on the page. Truly, writing has been a love of mine from an early age.

Abigail Thompson, on the other hand, had to deal with her mother’s dream. She wanted her daughter to sing on the stage of the Central City Opera House. Abigail felt more suited for praising the Lord in song on her outings in the mountains of Colorado. Her new home.

Another snippet I’d like to share is an encounter between my main characters: Abigail Thompson and Noah Presley. When they bump into each other at the mercantile, more than sparks fly.

“Mr. Presley, excuse me.”

Noah’s jabbering came to a halt when he heard the female voice. Seconds later, something tapped him on the bottom of his boot. When he lay on his stomach to fill the lower shelves, he didn’t realize his size 12 feet stuck out from under the curtain between the back room and the front of the mercantile. He scrambled to stand up and flung open the divider and said, “May I help y—”

Miss Abigail Thompson stood smack dab in front of him, her nose a mere two inches from his chest. The only thing Noah could see of the new arrival was the top of her flowered bonnet and some blond curls peeking out from underneath the wide brim.

He stepped back after he recovered from almost knocking the attractive girl flat on her behind. Abigail did the same, then tilted her head to look up at him.

“Yes, Mr. Presley, you can help me.” She scooted away from him and headed in the opposite direction. “I need you to reach something for me, if you please?”

Noah let her lead the way and could only imagine he resembled a dutiful pup following after his master. But in this instance, he made sure he walked far enough behind her that he didn’t step on the hem of her ruffled skirt.

He also couldn’t help but notice anytime Abigail entered the mercantile, her presence turned his mind to mush. His tongue stuck to the roof of his mouth, and what came out didn’t resemble words in the King’s English.

“Mr. Presley, ah, Mama’s in need of some, ah, let me see. There it is.” Abigail pointed up at the next to the top shelf at a row of kerosene bottles. “The hurricane lamps she unwrapped today need oil.”

Noah nodded and stepped up on the ladder to retrieve the merchandise. He wondered why it had taken her mother so long to unpack her lamps. Night had fallen more than once since their arrival. If he’d known, he’d have taken some to them the day he went to call.

He reached his long arms up as high as they would go, but he still couldn’t reach the bottles. Noah needed to talk to Adam about his placement of certain items. Top shelves. A location which required a ladder.

Help me, Jesus!

Taking another step up meant he would venture into uncharted territory…

Noah was about to take a step out of where he felt comfortable. Think of time you’ve stepped out of your comfort zone. Did you survive? I’d say you did, if you’re reading this, and you’re happy you did.

And as a writer, stepping out takes courage, gumption… @nettiefudge Click To Tweet

And as a writer, stepping out takes courage, gumption…and it takes an IDEA. In my case, Chords of Love came to me when a dear friend and I brainstormed about a story set in the 1800s. Of course, my love of Colorado inspired the setting. Visualize someone twisting my arm (wink, wink) when research called me to Central City, Colorado.

Those who know me, know I’m lying. I moved to Colorado in my early 20s and spent over twenty-five years in Boulder and surrounding areas. And loved every minute. If you’ve never visited, make it a point to go. GOD OF ALL CREATION LIVES THERE.

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Janetta Fudge-Messmer’s books are available on Amazon. She is also on Twitter and Facebook.

Mar 082017
 

Young women are awakening to the fact that many rights and freedoms they have known for a lifetime are not cast in stone. There also seems to be beyond-Susan-B-Anthony-level interest in Women’s History Month and increased interest in International Women’s Day. In some places, this includes A Day Without A Woman — a strike designed to highlight the contributions women make to commerce and to community.

A beyond-Susan-B-Anthony-level interest in #Women's History Month? Click To Tweet

I’ve been reading a variety of authors, news sources and social commentary and, am still not sure how I feel about the concept. After all, many women wear red for Valentine’s Day and to raise awareness of heart health. And not going to work? Probably not a safe or reasonable option for those making $0.78 on the dollar.

I’ve spent much of my life working as an advocate for women, children, and people with disabilities so, what I often do in the face of loud, political noise? I make it personal. Individual. It helps me to remember that all issues have individual people and families connected to them. So, with apologies to event organizers, this is my #daywithoutawoman.

Hundreds — maybe thousands — of people would not have enjoyed their Independence Day celebrations without the pyrotechnic expertise of this woman. Oh… and then there are the people she has helped as a volunteer firefighter and, more recently, as a paramedic. And the ones who have been inspired by her willingness to pursue her love of art.

Jini

For more than twenty years, this woman traveled each week to a women’s prison where she met with women who wanted to change their lives. There’s no telling how many changed, or how dramatically… but those who were touched by her kindness, her wisdom, and her patience, went on to share those things with others.

I’m not sure that, when someone has been sexually assaulted, she cares about the number of other people her advocate has helped — she just wants someone to help her restore some balance in order to make important decisions. And, if said advocate created a mechanism to support others in this difficult work? Well, then she would be the woman pictured here.

Bernadette

And speaking of advocates… I can’t count the number of children made safer, parents become more attentive, crises averted and workers trained to do the job right if not for this woman.  Oh. And she led the charge to start the first child advocacy center in her state.

And, yes. I’m listing them here anonymously because that’s how they’ve worked: accomplishing vital work, both paid and unpaid, to help prevent violence and decrease crime. To help people in dire straights stand back up and believe in themselves and their right to be safe.

May you never experience #DayWithoutaWoman Click To Tweet

On this International Women’s Day I honor them and millions like them. I believe I speak for the thousands their passion and skills have touched when I say, “may you never experience #daywithoutawoman.”

 

 March 8, 2017  Posted by  Special Topics 4 Responses »
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